European law the ordinary legislative procedure

This means that the directly elected European Parliament has to approve EU legislation together with the Council the governments of the 28 EU countries. Drafting EU law Before the Commission proposes new initiatives it assesses the potential economic, social and environmental consequences that they may have. The Commission also consults interested parties such as non-governmental organisations, local authorities and representatives of industry and civil society.

European law the ordinary legislative procedure

Ordinary legislative procedure in detail Step 1: There are two possible outcomes: The Council is allowed to amend any possible amendments made by the Parliament Step 3: Parliament has four options: The Parliament is allowed to amend amendments made by the Council If Parliament decides to amend the proposal, the proposal is sent to the Commission.

The Commission will issue an opinion on the amended proposal, after which the proposal is submitted to the Council. At the Council, there are two possible outcomes: Decision-making in the Council at this point depends on the advice of the Commission: The Committee is composed of delegations of Council, Parliament and Commission.

Negotiations take place on the basis of the proposals made by the Parliament and the Council in their respective second readings.

If negotiations on an amended proposal are not concluded within six weeks, the proposal is rejected. They can either approve or reject the proposal, amendments are not permitted. On voting procedures For every step in the decision-making process the European Parliament decides by majority vote.

Unless indicated otherwise the Council decides by qualified majority vote. Mandatory opinions In their respective policy areas the European Economic and Social Committee, the Committee of the Regions, the European Central Bank and the Court of Auditors have to be consulted on proposals before Parliament and Council can finalise their decision-procedures in the first reading.

Emergency break procedure By means of this procedure a member state can request the Council to suspend the legislative process. The proposal is then put to the European Council.

Legislative procedure

The emergency break procedure can only be invoked for fundamental proposals in a limited number of policy areas foreign and defence policy, social security, judicial cooperation in criminal matters. Exceptions In a limited number of policy areas the Commission may submit proposals together with the member states, the European Court of Justice or the European Central Bank.

In such cases the procedure is slightly modified. Council and Parliament now have to inform the Commission of their views at each step of the legislative process, and they can ask the Commission for an opinion at each step as well.

The Commission can issue an opinion at any given moment in the legislative proces at their own initiative. Voting procedures, the right of amendment and the rules on adopting or rejecting a proposal remain the same. The policy areas this exception can be applied to are: Application of the ordinary legislative procedure The ordinary legislative procedure is the standard procedure for all decision-making in the European Union, unless the treaties state otherwise.

In such cases one of the extraordinary decision-making procedures is used. As a result, most policy areas use the ordinary legislative procedure. A general exception to this rule is the common foreign and defence policy. Other important policy areas where the ordinary legislative procedure is not used are institutional reforms, tax policy, a fair share of social policies and a number of areas in the field of justice and home affairs.

In practice, most proposals are adopted at first reading. The reason for this is that the European institutions hold extensive deliberations before the Commission formally submits a proposal.n European Law the Ordinary legislative procedure is used when drafting hard law to ensure that the democratically elected representatives of the EU citizens have an equal say in appropriate areas of law making.

There will be a brief analyse of the Ordinary legislative procedure and a discussion on it. n European Law the Ordinary legislative procedure is used when drafting hard law to ensure that the democratically elected representatives of the EU citizens have an equal say in appropriate areas of law making.

There will be a brief analyse of the Ordinary legislative procedure and a discussion on it. The ordinary legislative procedure is the standard procedure for all decision-making in the European Union, unless the treaties state otherwise. In such cases one of the extraordinary decision-making procedures is used.

As a result, most policy areas use the ordinary legislative procedure.

European law the ordinary legislative procedure

The ordinary legislative procedure gives the same weight to the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union on a wide range of areas (for example, economic governance, immigration, energy, transport, the environment and consumer protection). May 26,  · This handbook explains all you need to know about the revised ordinary legislative procedure and sets out the respective roles of the Presidency and the General It describes the various stages of the procedure: the three readings, the conciliation procedure and the alphabetnyc.comed on: May 26, The ordinary legislative procedure gives the same weight to the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union on a wide range of areas (for example, economic governance, immigration, energy, transport, the environment and consumer protection).

Ordinary legislative procedure (COD) - EU monitor